Say you walk into a department store looking for a new pair of shoes.  As you approach the shelves you realize that nothing is really interesting but your focus is drawn to two potential pairs.  With the first pair your experience is limited, but you know people who have purchased that brand and who were satisfied (WOM).  Perhaps you had already owned a pair of the other name brand shoe and were happy with your purchase.

Which pair would you buy?  The unknown or the one with which you had personal experience?

Like buying a pair of shoes, but with more far-reaching impacts, today’s election is about consumer choice.  (Sadly too many voters will spend more effort researching the right pair of shoes than the next President.  In fairness, a pair of shoes doesn’t have to deal with large special interest groups.)  Nevertheless, each voter is making a selection based on the attributes they find appealing about the product (i.e. the candidate).  Those attributes might be:

  • Price (budget philosophy)
  • Customer service (candidate likability)
  • Quality (trustworthiness)

Regardless of how you rate the candidates, vote.

The pivot point is to exercise your personal choice to help determine the direction of the nation.  Later in the week we’ll celebrate Veteran’s Day to recognize those who have served our nation.  The nation was built on the right, but also the responsibility, to choose.  Get moving, the polls close soon.

Voting is an Exercise in Consumer Choice
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